Genetic Archaeology
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  About |  Newsletter |  Submit News |  Links |  Subscribe to GeneticArchaeology.com RSS Fee Subscribe


More Articles
Diffeomorphometry and geodesic positioning systems for human anatomyDiffeomorphometry and geodesic positioning systems for human anatomy

Thermoelectric generator on glass fabric for wearable electronic devicesThermoelectric generator on glass fabric for wearable electronic devices

Scientists grow cartilage to reconstruct noseScientists grow cartilage to reconstruct nose

Simplicity is key to co-operative robotsSimplicity is key to co-operative robots

Researchers develop ErSb nanostructures with applications in infrared and terahertz rangesResearchers develop ErSb nanostructures with applications in infrared and terahertz ranges

Appearance of night-shining clouds has increasedAppearance of night-shining clouds has increased

Ancient shark fossil reveals new insights into jaw evolutionAncient shark fossil reveals new insights into jaw evolution

Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfacesGecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequencedDeadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Vitamin B3 might have been made in space, delivered to Earth by meteoritesVitamin B3 might have been made in space, delivered to Earth by meteorites

Chemists' work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes and diseasesChemists' work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes and diseases

Satellite shows high productivity from US corn beltSatellite shows high productivity from US corn belt

Sperm meets egg: Protein essential for fertilization discoveredSperm meets egg: Protein essential for fertilization discovered

Researchers determine how mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition and signalingResearchers determine how mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition and signaling

The surprising consequences of banning chocolate milkThe surprising consequences of banning chocolate milk

Running geese give insight into low oxygen toleranceRunning geese give insight into low oxygen tolerance

Galactic serial killerGalactic serial killer

Positive, negative thinkers' brains revealedPositive, negative thinkers' brains revealed

Babies prefer fairness -- but only if it benefits them -- in choosing a playmateBabies prefer fairness -- but only if it benefits them -- in choosing a playmate

A new twist makes for better steel, researchers findA new twist makes for better steel, researchers find

Renewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investmentsRenewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investments

Study finds gaming augments players' social livesStudy finds gaming augments players' social lives

A breakthrough in creating invisibility cloaks, stealth technologyA breakthrough in creating invisibility cloaks, stealth technology

Overcoming structural uncertainty in computer modelsOvercoming structural uncertainty in computer models

Monkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier studyMonkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier study

Researchers developed world's first fluorescent sensor to detect date rape drugResearchers developed world's first fluorescent sensor to detect date rape drug

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Turning back the clock on aging muscles?Turning back the clock on aging muscles?

New study finds differences in concussion risk between football helmetsNew study finds differences in concussion risk between football helmets

Uros people of Peru and Bolivia found to have distinctive genetic ancestries (9/19/2013)

Tags:
ancestry, bird, culture, peru, san, species
This image shows the community gathering on one of the Uros Islands on the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca. -  Eduardo Rubiano
This image shows the community gathering on one of the Uros Islands on the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca. - Eduardo Rubiano

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project consortium shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano, or high plain, of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago. Despite the fact that the Uros today share many lineages with the surrounding Andean populations, they have maintained their own divergent genetic ancestry.

WHO ARE THE UROS?: The Uros are a self-identified ethnic group, about 2,000 of whom live in Peru, many of them on artificial floating islands on Lake Titicaca. Another 2,600 individuals live beside lakes and rivers of Bolivia. According to some anthropologists, the Uros are descendants of the first settlers of the Altiplano - the Andean plateau - yet their origin has been subjected to considerable academic debate. Those from Peru have long claimed to descend from the ancient Urus (Uruquilla speakers), using their differentiated ethnic identity to assert rights and prerogatives for their use of Titicaca's natural resources. The Uros have historically been the target of discrimination by the pre-Inca, Inca and the Spanish, and this continues today. Some people have alleged that the Uros disappeared a long time ago and that the new islanders have conjured up an ancient heritage in order to attract tourists and receive special recognition and rights.

SCIENTIFIC PAPER PUBLICATION: A paper on the research, "The Genetic History of Indigenous Populations of the Peruvian and Bolivian Altiplano: The Legacy of the Uros," will be published Sept. 11 by the journal PLOS ONE. The paper is embargoed until 5 p.m. (ET, U.S.) Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, and is at: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073006

QUOTES FROM AUTHORS: "We have found a concrete connection to the distinctive past for the Uros," said Fabricio R. Santos, professor at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, the leading coauthor of the paper. "When we shared this information with the Uros people, they were quite enthusiastic about the news," said Professor Ricardo Fujita of the Universidad San Martin de Porres, Lima, Peru, coauthor of the paper.

"We were excited to observe some Y lineages only found among the Uros," said Professor JosÚ R. Sandoval at the Universidad San Martin de Porres, Lima, Peru, first author of the paper and a Peruvian Aymara born on the shores of Lake Titicaca.

"The timing of human settlement in the Andean Altiplano is one of the great mysteries of our species' worldwide odyssey - a vast, high-altitude plain that seems utterly inhospitable, yet it has apparently nurtured a complex culture for millennia," said Spencer Wells, Genographic Project director and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. "This significant new study reflects the importance of the Genographic team's careful, patient work with the members of the indigenous communities living in this remote corner of the mountainous South American terrain, and sheds light on how our species has adapted to disparate ecosystems since its relatively recent exodus from an African homeland less than 70,000 years ago."

RESEARCH METHODS: Representatives of the Genographic Project, which uses project leaders compared the Uros' haplotype (genetic lineages) profiles with those of eight Aymara-, nine Quechua- and two Arawak-speaking populations from the western region of South America.

BACKGROUND ON UROS: The Andean highlands are home to a vast indigenous population of several million, mostly Aymaras and Quechuas. The Uros are a minority group that consider themselves descendants of the ancient Urus, who are generally recognized as the first major ethnic group to have settled in the Andes, specifically the Lake Titicaca watershed. As a result of successive invasions by Aymara populations and the Incas, an increasing proportion of the Uros became confined to floating islands and small villages around the lake. Today, the Uros of Peru and Bolivia are also known as Qhas Qut su˝i, which means "people of the lake" in the ancient Uruquilla language. Their economy was originally based on aquatic resources, especially fishing, bird hunting and gathering of bird eggs. Using the lake's reeds for construction of islands, houses and handicrafts for tourism, the Uros have become a fascination to visitors, and the Altiplano is now Peru's second most important tourist destination.

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the National Geographic Society

Post Comments:

Search

New Articles
The story of animal domestication retoldThe story of animal domestication retold

Trisomy 21: How an extra little  chromosome throws the  entire genome off balanceTrisomy 21: How an extra little chromosome throws the entire genome off balance

At the origin of cell divisionAt the origin of cell division

Study finds new links between number of duplicated genes and adaptation

Does germ plasm accelerate evolution?

Faithful allies since the CretaceousFaithful allies since the Cretaceous

Ferns borrowed genes to flourish in low lightFerns borrowed genes to flourish in low light

Study tests theory that life originated at deep sea ventsStudy tests theory that life originated at deep sea vents

Scientists firm up origin of cold-adapted yeasts that make cold beerScientists firm up origin of cold-adapted yeasts that make cold beer

Lactase persistence alleles reveal ancestry of southern African Khoe pastoralists

Examination of a cave-dwelling fish finds a possible genetic link to human disordersExamination of a cave-dwelling fish finds a possible genetic link to human disorders

New research initiative investigates gene regulation in evolution and development

The Neanderthal in usThe Neanderthal in us

The human 'hairless' gene identified: One form of baldness explained

Going batty for jumping DNA as a cause of species diversity



Archives
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
June 2005
October 2004
July 2001


Science Friends
Agricultural Science
Astronomy News
Biology News
Biomimicry Science
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Cybernetics Research
Electonics Research
Forensics Report
Fossil News
Genetics News
Geology News
Microbiology Research
Nanotech News
Parenting News
Physics News


  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2015 Web Doodle, LLC. All rights reserved.